Tag Archives: companion planting

Guerrilla Gardening

Meet Ron Finley – resident of South Central L.A. and guerrilla gardener. Even if you’ve never been near the place, you probably have at least a vague notion that South Central is not really where you want to find yourself. But for the residents, it’s home, and many people couldn’t move if they wanted to (and they probably want to). So, instead of jumping ship, this man decided to do something about it; to try to make a difference that everyone in his community could appreciate and anyone could participate in if they wanted.

Food Deserts

South Central L.A. is considered a food desert. That means that the residents don’t have access to healthy foods within a relatively convenient distance, though they often have plenty of access to fast food, and convenience and liquor stores. Food deserts exist all over the U.S., predominantly effecting lower-income areas, where there are, on average, 3 times fewer grocery stores than in wealthier neighborhoods. This is entirely related to the off-balance obesity rates and incidents of type-2 diabetes in these communities.

Why you should get involved

The purposes of guerrilla gardening are to both beautify and provide healthy food for local communities, no matter what their socio-economic status. As the gap between wealth and poverty widens and the middle class shrinks, it’s not just the food deserts that need help. In suburban neighborhoods, many people are struggling more to make ends meet and, as Ron Finley says, “growing your own food is like printing your own money,” and he tells us that about $1 worth of green beans can generate as much as $75 worth of produce.

The effects are much more far-reaching than that, though. These gardens offer incredible educational opportunities for both children and adults, to learn how to be more self-sufficient and to understand and appreciate the importance of fresh vegetables, for health, yes, but for well-being in general. Kids that are out in the garden aren’t out getting into trouble, or sitting in front of a television. They’re learning how to improve themselves and their communities instead of watching fast food advertisements. Another great benefit is that you can control where your seeds come from and how they’re grown. You can buy non-GMO seeds, and choose not to use pesticides. You generate less waste from trips to the grocery store and all the paper and plastic you come away with in addition to your food. This is something worth getting involved with in some capacity, even if you’re just chucking sunflower seeds down a grate or creating graffiti art with moss (link to instructions below). Make whatever difference you can!

Watch Ron Finley’s TED talk. It’s only about 10 minutes long and worth your time!

Learn more about food deserts at the Food Empowerment Project.

Advice and tips on how to get started

Community pages on guerrillagardening.org and a Facebook page – try to find other guerrilla gardeners in your area to team up with

How to make moss graffiti

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Herbs & Spices for Health & Garden

Keep yourself out of the medicine cabinet, and the round-up out of your garden

ad01c-generalWe have too much salt in our food, and it’s really just a substitute for flavor. Most of it comes from processed foods that are often very high in sodium to cover up all the artificial stuff. But this can also lead to an acquired taste that gets us putting excess salt in our food even when we cook at home. Salt is vital for our bodies, and a healthy amount is an important part of our diets. It also enhances the potency of other flavors, but should be used sparingly, and certainly not to the exclusion of everything else. You’ll have to re-train your taste-buds, but you’ll enjoy the flavors more in the end.

Using a different set of spices or herbs than what you normally use can also add a whole different dimension to your meals and allow you to enjoy the creative process of cooking rather than seeing it as a mere chore.

The most important reason, though, why it’s bad that salt is the go-to flavor enhancer in so many food products and for so many people at home is that herbs and spices offer significant health benefits. They are one more piece to the puzzle of living a sustainable and healthy lifestyle.

But it doesn’t end there. Companion planting with herbs is not only a flavorful addition to your dinner and good for your health, many herb and spice plants also help your garden by naturally deterring pests and attracting the ‘good’ insects that eat the pests rather than eating your crops for you. Here is a list of some of the herbs and spices that offer the most benefit for both you and your garden:

Basil – Definitely makes the top of the list. It’s incredible stuff. Basil is anti-inflammatory, good for cardiovascular health and the upper respiratory system, and fights off bacteria such as staphylococcus, e. coli, shigella, and pseudomonas. Adding basil to your next salad can actually help ensure it’s safe to eat. Basil is also high in vitamins K, A, B6 and C, as well as iron, calcium, fiber, manganese and more. In your garden it will benefit the growth and the flavor of tomatoes, asparagus, peppers, oregano and petunias. Many of the health benefits from basil come from its essential oils, which will benefit from being planted with…

Chamomile – Great for your digestion and helps with abdominal pain, cramps, and breathing when you have a cold, as well as being a mild sedative. Good for soothing headaches and skin problems, too. It even seems to help with hormone regulation, which might be why it looks to be effective against some cancers, including breast and prostate cancer. Planted alongside any other herb, chamomile helps to increase its essential oils. It also helps out cabbage, cucumber, onions and wheat, and attracts hoverflies and wasps which pollinate and feed on unwelcome garden guests like aphids.

Cilantro/Coriander – These both come from the same plant, which is a good source of dietary fiber, calcium and magnesium. It lowers bad and raises good cholesterol, protects against nausea and arthritis, UTIs and salmonella! In your garden it protects from spider mites, aphids and potato bugs.

Dill – A very good source of calcium to help prevent bone loss. Dill also protects against free radicals and some carcinogens, and has antibacterial properties. It makes a good companion for cabbage, lettuce, onion, sweet corn and cucumbers, keeping away spider mites, squash bugs and aphids wile attracting pollinators.

Garlic – Whole books are written about garlic. It’s antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and eating it daily has been shown to help protect against most types of cancer. It helps metabolize iron and has cardiovascular benefits as well. It’s as close as we get to an actual panacea. Planted with apple, pear and peach trees, roses, cucumbers, peas, lettuce, and celery it helps keep rabbits and a myriad of pests away from your food.

Mint – A rich source of dietary fiber, magnesium, iron, folate, and calcium, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B2, potassium and copper. Mint is good for your tummy and can help you breathe if you have asthma, allergies, or a cold. It’s also antibacterial, fighting e. coli, salmonella, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and others, and inhibits certain types of fungus. Cuttings of mint can be used as mulch, which will help keep mice out and is beneficial for cabbage, mustard, turnips, and broccoli. The living plant attracts bees and deters beetles, mosquitoes, ants, aphids and more.

There are so many flowers, herbs and spices that make good companion plants and benefit health. Do some research to decide what would be best for your garden and keep them in mind while you’re planning for next summer. Of course, during the winter you can keep potted herbs going in your kitchen to continue to enjoy their advantages.

Resources to get you started:

Check out this comprehensive infographic of complementary flavors. Every home cook should have access to this resource.

Companion Planting: friend & foe

Herbal companions

The basics of companion planting

Health benefits

Cooking with herbs & spices

Seed Bombing

Seed bombs are an ancestral Japanese gardening technique, called Tsuchi Dango (earth dumpling), re-integrated into farming practices by Masanobu Fukuoka, microbiologist, farmer and author of The One Straw Revolution. Their purpose is to plant and grow with minimal human intervention, which makes them perfect for guerrilla gardening (more about that another day). You make a little ball of clay and compost or fertilizer with the seeds rolled up inside. This gives them a good start in life no matter where they land.

After about 3 weeks, give or take depending on rainfall, temperatures, etc, the seeds will start to germinate, pushing down into the soil, and the ball will break apart as the plant grows, loosening more seeds to germinate.

Some Considerations

flower-1085136_640There are a few things to consider in seed bombing. Think about your environment and opt for non-invasive species. You can make seed bombs with one type of plant, or with a combination of seeds from different plants that play well together (companion planting). The earth is your canvas, and you can beautify it any way you like. You might even want to create a slow explosion of herbs, like basil, rosemary, thyme…or a soft ground cover around the base of an urban tree that will provide the soil with nitrogen, like clover…or flowers that provide comestibles for bees and butterflies…whatever you like.

Another thing to think about is possible intervention. Your efforts will be wasted if you seed bomb an area that gets mowed by city workers. Look for neglected spots or little islands of safety where the mowers can’t reach, such as under park benches or right up against the side of a building.

Community

Neglected and desolate spaces have a negative impact on the community, mentally and demographically. They’re ugly, repellent. We often manage to walk by them without paying attention, blocking them from our overt mental processes, but anything you see is ultimately processed by your brain, whether you know it or not. You can make a very real difference in the well-being of your community, and have fun doing it! So if you don’t have plans for the weekend, or are feeling bored, do a little seed bombing project. Here are some simple instructions for making seed bombs. There are several different ways to make them and lots of tutorials available, so feel free to search for one that works for you. Watch this Seed Bomber video to get inspired!

 

 

 

 

 

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